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Items filtered by date: February 2024

The surge in global diabetes has led to a rise in diabetic foot ulcers, posing significant health challenges. In the mid-19th century, Marchal de Calvi and Thomas Hodgkin identified the link between diabetes and foot gangrene, paving the way for pioneering treatments like Frederick Treves' sharp debridement method. Treves emphasized pressure relief and patient education. The discovery of insulin in the 20th century improved diabetic patients' lives but also increased foot disease cases. Elliot Joslin established the first foot clinic in 1928, advocating a multidisciplinary approach. Penicillin's discovery in 1928 revolutionized infection treatment, reducing amputation rates. Revascularization techniques and limb salvage became critical, with Frank Wheelock pioneering bypass grafts. Topical negative pressure therapy emerged in the 1990s, aiding wound healing. Despite advancements, chronic diabetic ulcers remain a challenge, with ongoing research for new treatments. Current treatment involves a multidisciplinary approach, controlling diabetes, and utilizing various wound care methods. Challenges persist, underscoring the importance of diabetics scheduling routine appointments with a podiatrist for foot examinations and specialized care.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with David K. Morris, DPM from Florida. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Plantation, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care

Vitamin B-3, also known as niacin, plays a vital role in maintaining healthy skin and overall well-being. A deficiency in this essential nutrient can lead to various skin issues, including cracked heels. Cracked heels, characterized by dry, fissured skin around the edges of the heel, often result from inadequate moisture retention and weakened skin integrity. Vitamin B-3 deficiency exacerbates this condition by impairing the skin's ability to retain moisture and regenerate cells effectively. Incorporating niacin-rich foods such as meat, fish, nuts, and fortified cereals into the diet can help prevent vitamin B-3 deficiency and alleviate cracked heels. Understanding the connection between vitamin B-3 deficiency and cracked heels underscores the importance of maintaining a balanced diet and proper skin care regimen for optimal foot health. If you have developed cracked heels, it is suggested that you consult a podiatrist for successful treatment methods, in addition to determining if there is an adequate amount of vitamin B-3 in your daily food intake, and how it may relate to cracked heels.

Cracked heels are unsightly and can cause further damage to your shoes and feet. If you have any concerns, contact David K. Morris, DPM from Florida. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Cracked Heels

Cracked heels appear unappealing and can make it harder for you walk around in sandals. Aside from looking unpleasant, cracked heels can also tear stockings, socks, and wear out your shoes. There are several methods to help restore a cracked heel and prevent further damage.

How Do You Get Them?

Dry skin is the number one culprit in creating cracked heels. Many athletes, walkers, joggers, and even swimmers suffer from cracked heels. Age and skin oil production play a role to getting cracked heels as well.

Promote Healing

Over the counter medicines can help, especially for those that need instant relief or who suffer from chronic dry feet.

Wear Socks – Wearing socks with medicated creams helps lock in moisture.

Moisturizers – Applying both day and night will help alleviate dryness which causes cracking.

Pumice Stones – These exfoliate and remove dead skin, which allows for smoother moisturizer application and better absorption into the skin. 

Change in Diet

Eating healthy with a well-balanced diet will give the skin a fresh and radiant look. Your body responds to the kinds of food you ingest. Omega-3 fatty acids and zinc supplements can also revitalize skin tissue.

Most importantly, seek professional help if unsure how to proceed in treating cracked heels. A podiatrist will help you with any questions or information needed. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Plantation, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Solutions for Cracked Heels
Wednesday, 07 February 2024 00:00

Let Us Treat Your Feet This Winter

Take extra care when walking on snow and ice. If you experience a fall and sustain an injury, we're here to help. We treat trauma, soft tissue injuries, and fractures.

Tuesday, 06 February 2024 00:00

Stiff Big Toe and Orthotics

Hallux limitus is a condition where the big toe joint gets sore, stiff, and inflamed. If not treated, it can turn into hallux rigidus, where the joint cannot move, causing a lot of pain and difficulty walking. To help with these issues, foot doctors focus on making the joint move better to reduce pain and improve how it works. They often use special shoe inserts with a deeper heel and a part that supports the inside of the foot. The doctors also look at whether the problem is because the joint does not work well or if it is because of the shape of the foot. Depending on the issue, they may use different kinds of inserts. They usually avoid certain materials and features that can make things worse. When making these inserts for everyday shoes, podiatrists think about things like foot strength and how the foot lines up. They may suggest exercises, massage, and good shoes. If you have a stiff and painful big toe, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for treatment, which may include orthotics.

If you are having discomfort in your feet and would like to try orthotics, contact David K. Morris, DPM from Florida. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Are Orthotics?

Orthotics are inserts you can place into your shoes to help with a variety of foot problems such as flat feet or foot pain. Orthotics provide relief and comfort for minor foot and heel pain but can’t correct serious biomechanical problems in your feet.

Over-the-Counter Inserts

Orthotics come in a wide variety of over-the-counter inserts that are used to treat foot pain, heel pain, and minor problems. For example, arch supports can be inserted into your shoes to help correct overarched or flat feet, while gel insoles are often used because they provide comfort and relief from foot and heel pain by alleviating pressure.

Prescription Orthotics

If over-the-counter inserts don’t work for you or if you have a more severe foot concern, it is possible to have your podiatrist prescribe custom orthotics. These high-quality inserts are designed to treat problems such as abnormal motion, plantar fasciitis, and severe forms of heel pain. They can even be used to help patients suffering from diabetes by treating foot ulcers and painful calluses and are usually molded to your feet individually, which allows them to provide full support and comfort.

If you are experiencing minor to severe foot or heel pain, it’s recommended to speak with your podiatrist about the possibilities of using orthotics. A podiatrist can determine which type of orthotic is right for you and allow you to take the first steps towards being pain-free.

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Plantation, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Ankle Foot Orthotics for Athletes
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